LibreOffice QA: Over 1000 Bibisects Served!

Nearly every day of the year, members of the LibreOffice QA Team triage incoming bugs, offer support and advice on IRC, highlight and discuss important bug reports, and deal with the behind-the-scenes minutiae required to keep our bug tracker running smoothly and efficiently.

Since 2012, one of the most powerful weapons in our QA arsenal has been bibisect, a git-based regression-hunting tool that vastly simplifies and speeds up the task of identifying when and where problems have been introduced into the code. Our bibisect repositories cover different time periods in our codebase, allowing us to trace both recently introduced issues as well as long-standing bugs.

Tools such as bibisect, as well as excellent cooperation and collaboration between teams within the LibreOffice community, allow us to keep the growth of our regressions low, and the graph of regressions very flat:

regressions-for-bibisect-postWith use of our bibisect repositories growing since 2012, we finally reached our 1000th bibisect. I’m happy to announce that contributor Terrence Enger performed our 1000th bibisect, helping us to identify an issue in how we format comments in Writer. A big thanks to Terrence (who performed not only the 1000th, but also the 1001st bibisect), and as well to everyone on the QA Team who is using our bibisect repositories to help us identify regressions!

If you’re interested in learning more about bibisect, please take a look at Matthew Francis’ excellent talk from the 2015 LibreOffice Annual Conference. It’s a great introduction to the fundamentals of how bibisecting works (e.g. “What is bisection?”), as well as nuances about how we triage bugs and format them so that they may be fixed as quickly and easily as possible:

matthew-francis-bibisect-talk_aarhus_img7If you’re interested in rolling up your sleeves and graduating from spectator to contributor, the LibreOffice QA Team would be more than happy to welcome you into the fold and help you take your first steps in contributing. Find us on IRC at #libreoffice-qa on Freenode or drop an email on the QA Mailing List. Perhaps you’ll be the one to perform our 2000th bibisection!

Mark your calendars: LibreOffice Bugzilla Migration is 1 month away!

tdf-walrus_experiment-iconWhat did you hope to get this Christmas? A new sled? A new laptop? Free Software that can fill out PDF forms?[1]

The LibreOffice QA Team has been hoping to migrate our bugtracker to our own infrastructure for the past year, and after a bunch of testing and experimenting, this January our wish is coming true!

On January 24th, 2015, The Document Foundation will commence migration of our bugtracker from Freedesktop.org infrastructure to TDF-hosted machines. Migration will give us increased flexibility to extend and modify the underlying Bugzilla code to match our needs, integrate other TDF services with the bug tracker, and provide more granular services for projects such as the Impress Remote and the Document Liberation Project.

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